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wiki:user:mizoguchi_s_continuity_project [2014/04/18 13:03]
nostradamus
wiki:user:mizoguchi_s_continuity_project [2018/07/29 01:22] (current)
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 Above all, the long take reflects a motif which defines both Mizoguchi’s visual style and his desires for the content of this film—seamless,​ fluid integration. ​ Long takes preserve the integrity of a single scene, and even between scenes fluidity is often maintained through congruous camera movements, lighting similarities,​ and parallel narrative structures. ​  If it is Mizoguchi’s aesthetic desire to have the film run as a fluid, unbroken work, it is as much his aim to have the dual realities of the film(the subjective and supernatural vs. objective reality) be integrated just as seamlessly. ​  ​Mizoguchi doesn’t provide obvious indicators to distinguish the real from the delusional. ​ His specters don’t levitate and glow; rather, clues of their unreality are subtly implanted into the context of the scene. (Genjuro’s unreliability is delicately hinted at when he first visits the Kimono dealer and his point-of-view shots contain no Kimono dealer at all.  The ghostly elements have prevalent shadows. ​  The apparitions sometimes descend into the darkness of the shot in a suggestive, but not conclusive, ethereal manner, etc.)  The real and the unreal coexist in a mostly undistinguishable formation on the screen, just as the harsher realities of Genjuro and Tobei’s lives blend with only subtle distinction with their fantasies and delusions. ​  ​Genjuro’s homecoming serves as a prime example of Mizoguchi’s dual integration. ​ In a single take, Genjuro enters a dark, abandoned cottage, exits from the rear, and then the camera slowly pans back to the cottage entrance to reveal an image of Genjuro ​ re-entering the cottage to find Miyagi, replete with lit candle and flame. ​  In this example, the real and unreal occupy the same space, the same general time, and even the same single strip of film.  So then this is the coda of Mizoguchi’s integration of the two worlds, fully defined within his characteristic long take.   It turns out that the explanation to Mizoguchi’s preference for long takes is obvious: he prefers not to over-cut his film because he prefers the smooth texture of a film that flows contiguously and showcases his mastery of all the formal elements. ​ Notwithstanding,​ his preference for gapless combination translates directly into his thematic content, and in the cottage scene we get to see Mizoguchi’s formal and thematic fluidity techniques, integrated. ​ Above all, the long take reflects a motif which defines both Mizoguchi’s visual style and his desires for the content of this film—seamless,​ fluid integration. ​ Long takes preserve the integrity of a single scene, and even between scenes fluidity is often maintained through congruous camera movements, lighting similarities,​ and parallel narrative structures. ​  If it is Mizoguchi’s aesthetic desire to have the film run as a fluid, unbroken work, it is as much his aim to have the dual realities of the film(the subjective and supernatural vs. objective reality) be integrated just as seamlessly. ​  ​Mizoguchi doesn’t provide obvious indicators to distinguish the real from the delusional. ​ His specters don’t levitate and glow; rather, clues of their unreality are subtly implanted into the context of the scene. (Genjuro’s unreliability is delicately hinted at when he first visits the Kimono dealer and his point-of-view shots contain no Kimono dealer at all.  The ghostly elements have prevalent shadows. ​  The apparitions sometimes descend into the darkness of the shot in a suggestive, but not conclusive, ethereal manner, etc.)  The real and the unreal coexist in a mostly undistinguishable formation on the screen, just as the harsher realities of Genjuro and Tobei’s lives blend with only subtle distinction with their fantasies and delusions. ​  ​Genjuro’s homecoming serves as a prime example of Mizoguchi’s dual integration. ​ In a single take, Genjuro enters a dark, abandoned cottage, exits from the rear, and then the camera slowly pans back to the cottage entrance to reveal an image of Genjuro ​ re-entering the cottage to find Miyagi, replete with lit candle and flame. ​  In this example, the real and unreal occupy the same space, the same general time, and even the same single strip of film.  So then this is the coda of Mizoguchi’s integration of the two worlds, fully defined within his characteristic long take.   It turns out that the explanation to Mizoguchi’s preference for long takes is obvious: he prefers not to over-cut his film because he prefers the smooth texture of a film that flows contiguously and showcases his mastery of all the formal elements. ​ Notwithstanding,​ his preference for gapless combination translates directly into his thematic content, and in the cottage scene we get to see Mizoguchi’s formal and thematic fluidity techniques, integrated. ​
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