DEVTOME.COM HOSTING COSTS HAVE BEGUN TO EXCEED 115$ MONTHLY. THE ADMINISTRATION IS NO LONGER ABLE TO HANDLE THE COST WITHOUT ASSISTANCE DUE TO THE RISING COST. THIS HAS BEEN OCCURRING FOR ALMOST A YEAR, BUT WE HAVE BEEN HANDLING IT FROM OUR OWN POCKETS. HOWEVER, WITH LITERALLY NO DONATIONS FOR THE PAST 2+ YEARS IT HAS DEPLETED THE BUDGET IN SHORT ORDER WITH THE INCREASE IN ACTIVITY ON THE SITE IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS. OUR CPU USAGE HAS BECOME TOO HIGH TO REMAIN ON A REASONABLE COSTING PLAN THAT WE COULD MAINTAIN. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT THE DEVTOME PROJECT AND KEEP THE SITE UP/ALIVE PLEASE DONATE (EVEN IF ITS A SATOSHI) TO OUR DEVCOIN 1M4PCuMXvpWX6LHPkBEf3LJ2z1boZv4EQa OR OUR BTC WALLET 16eqEcqfw4zHUh2znvMcmRzGVwCn7CJLxR TO ALLOW US TO AFFORD THE HOSTING.

THE DEVCOIN AND DEVTOME PROJECTS ARE BOTH VERY IMPORTANT TO THE COMMUNITY. PLEASE CONTRIBUTE TO ITS FURTHER SUCCESS FOR ANOTHER 5 OR MORE YEARS!

Some research has been done recently (this is in the summer of 2013) that finds that people who use social media - in this case, Facebook - are less satisfied than people who interact with each other on a face to face basis. It would seem that sending messages to friends, whether they are real ones or people that you have never met or hardly ever met, is a poor substitute for a real relationship.

The study has been published by the The Public Library Of Science and was carried out by Philippe Verduyn of Leuven University in Belgium and Ethan Kross of the University of Michigan.

The results tell us that the more a person uses Facebook, the less satisfied they tend to be with their life.

Apparently using Facebook leads to people feeling jealousy, isolation, social tension, and depression. The study was the first to follow Facebook users over an extended period of time in order to find out how their emotions change with ongoing use of social media.

In the study, the researchers signed up 82 Facebook users. These were people (all of whom had volunteered for the study) who were either in their early twenties or late teens. They agreed to allow the researchers to follow their activity on Facebook for two weeks and to report on their state of mind five times a day, as well as reporting on the number and type of direct social contacts they had (i.e. meeting people or telephoning people). The way these reports were gathered was by the researchers sending the volunteers text messages between ten in the morning and midnight with a short questionnaire that the volunteers had to complete.

When the results were analyzed, the researchers discovered that the more a volunteer used Facebook in the time between two questionnaires, the worse the volunteer reported feeling in the later questionnaire.

Volunteers were also asked if they would rate their satisfaction with life both at the start and at the end of the study. Those who used Facebook more were more likely to report that their satisfaction with life had declined in comparison to those who used Facebook less frequently. By way of contrast, there was a positive correlation between the amount of direct social contact a volunteer had and how positive that person felt about life.

So, the more volunteers socialized in the real, traditional sense, the more positive they felt the next time they filled in one of the questionnaires. It also turned out that a volunteer’s gender had no bearing on the results. Also the size of their social network, their degree of loneliness, depression or self-esteem, and their motives for using Facebook had no influence on the results. The conclusion reached by Doctors Verduyn and Kross therefore was that Facebook diminishes rather than enhances a person's feelings of personal value, satisfaction and well-being.

The researchers didn't offer an explanation as to why this may be the case, but another earlier piece of research carried out by social scientists at Darmstadt Technical University and Humboldt University, both of which are in Germany, may shed some light on the matter.

Those researchers surveyed a total of 584 Facebook users, mostly in their 20s, and they discovered that the commonest emotion aroused in these people by their use of Facebook was …envy! Comparing themselves with their peers and their photoshopped photos and their carefully thought-out - and possibly false - messages left them feeling inadequate in comparison. Real life encounters, however, are rather more difficult to fake, and therefore are less likely to be able to be manipulated to make another person feel envious.

The researchers presented their findings at a Leipzig conference in February 2013.

Of course the focus on quizzing only younger users of Facebook begs the question of whether these feelings of social inadequacy are more down to immaturity than the effect of social media. Older Facebook users may be less inclined to feel inadequate and envious.

That could be the subject for future research.

Social Media


QR Code
QR Code social_media_users_are_sad_people (generated for current page)
 

Advertise with Anonymous Ads