DEVTOME.COM HOSTING COSTS HAVE BEGUN TO EXCEED 115$ MONTHLY. THE ADMINISTRATION IS NO LONGER ABLE TO HANDLE THE COST WITHOUT ASSISTANCE DUE TO THE RISING COST. THIS HAS BEEN OCCURRING FOR ALMOST A YEAR, BUT WE HAVE BEEN HANDLING IT FROM OUR OWN POCKETS. HOWEVER, WITH LITERALLY NO DONATIONS FOR THE PAST 2+ YEARS IT HAS DEPLETED THE BUDGET IN SHORT ORDER WITH THE INCREASE IN ACTIVITY ON THE SITE IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS. OUR CPU USAGE HAS BECOME TOO HIGH TO REMAIN ON A REASONABLE COSTING PLAN THAT WE COULD MAINTAIN. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT THE DEVTOME PROJECT AND KEEP THE SITE UP/ALIVE PLEASE DONATE (EVEN IF ITS A SATOSHI) TO OUR DEVCOIN 1M4PCuMXvpWX6LHPkBEf3LJ2z1boZv4EQa OR OUR BTC WALLET 16eqEcqfw4zHUh2znvMcmRzGVwCn7CJLxR TO ALLOW US TO AFFORD THE HOSTING.

THE DEVCOIN AND DEVTOME PROJECTS ARE BOTH VERY IMPORTANT TO THE COMMUNITY. PLEASE CONTRIBUTE TO ITS FURTHER SUCCESS FOR ANOTHER 5 OR MORE YEARS!

Rabies - A Public Threat

When 14-year-old Marian was brought to a hospital last year, she complained of a headache, a stabbing pain in her left leg and of being unusually thirsty. The admitting doctor found she was running a high fever and had a hard time breathing. But what worried him most was the strange trembling of her limbs. He placed her under careful observation.

The following morning, Marian's breath came in long, shuddering gasps. Saliva filled her gasps. Saliva filled her mouth and, when she tried to swallow, violent spasms tore at her throat muscles.

Upon close questioning, the girl's parents remembered that two months earlier she had been bitten by a dog. The father said the doctor had cleaned the wound, given her an anti-tetanus shot, and the sores had healed well.

Upon knowing this, the admitting doctor told the parents to trace the animal. They learned later on that a few days after it had bitten Marian, the dog had died and been buried on the owner's farm. When it was exhumed, an autopsy confirmed the doctor's worst fear: there was no hope for Marian now, for rabies, once it has permitted to take hold, cannot be checked.

Three weeks after she entered the hospital, Marian became another victim of rabies.

Unknown to many, six out of every million people get afflicted with rabies, a fatal and incurable virus. Not only that, 88 percent of those rabies victims were actually bitten by their pet dogs!

Here are more staggering facts: 10 percent of the reported rabies incidence can be traced to stray dogs. Another two percent were caused by cats. Children below 15 years account for 44 percent of rabies patients.

The World Health Organization reported that the countries with the highest human death rate for rabies in the world are India, Sri Lanka and Thailand & the Philippines.

The rabies problem is as old as mankind, dating back in written records to the Romans, Greeks, and Egyptians. The term “rabies,” however, came from the Sanskrit word rabhas, which means “to do violence.”

The earlier reference known that describes rabies dates back to the 20th century B.C. This was in the form of an ordinance in the Eshnunna Code of Mesopotamia. It has been translated as follows: Rabies in dogs was described accurately by Democritus (500 B.C.) and Aristotle (322 B.C.) who stated that other dogs bitten by rabid dogs likewise became mad. Galen (A.D. 200) recommended excising wounds caused by the bite of a rabid dog to prevent development of the disease.

Rabies was proven infectious by Zinke in 1804; he transmitted rabies from rabid to a normal dog by inoculating it with saliva from the infected animal. On the basis of this evidence, it was assumed that the control of stray dogs and quarantine of other domestic dogs would eliminate the disease. Denmark, Norway, and Sweden reportedly adopted these measures and by 1826 were free of dog rabies.

Medical experts say rabies is caused by an ultra-microscopic organism that attacks through any break in the skin, multiplies in the salivary glands of infected animals and is usually spread by biting.

In a new victim, the virus pauses for a while to gather force, then creeps into nearby nerves to make a fatal, shattering rendezvous with the brain. It can strike six days after exposure; more often, however, it takes a month or more. There was a reported case of a woman who came down with the disease 280 days after she had been bitten by a rabid dog.

The first sign of the disease in man is a hot pain in the area of exposure. A splitting headache and nausea follow, often accompanied by irrational irritability and strange forebodings of doom.

Although thirst may be agonizing, medical doctors say the very sight, or even mention, of water brings on severe spasms of the throat muscles – hence the term hydrophobia (literally, “fear of water”). Eventually sounds, lights, even gentle puffs of air can cause convulsions.

After about a week of such torture, the body becomes paralyzed. Death follows, usually caused by stoppage of breathing and blood circulation.

Rabies is suspected in most bites by mammals. A beast that unexpectedly bites a person should be confined and watched closely by a veterinarian for ten days to see if it has the disease. The best prevention, according to medical experts, is to avoid strange animals and those known to be rabid.

The vampire bats are the main carriers of rabies virus. The primary animals affected by rabies are dogs and cats since both usually serve as the reservoir of the disease. Cows, goats and sheep may also be affected. Ditto for human beings, who can be affected through the saliva of a dog or any rabid animal that bites.

Veterinarians say only laboratory examination can tell whether an animal who has bitten has rabies or not.

At present, there are three principal methods available in the country for the laboratory diagnosis of rabies. The first one is known as fluorescent antibody test, a rapid and highly sensitive test with almost 100 percent accuracy and highly specific. But this method requires sophisticated equipment and expensive reagents.

The next is called mouse inoculation test, a highly sensitive test but requires several days for a positive diagnosis. The last is direct microscopic examination, a rapid and cheap test but less sensitive.

For many years, treatment of rabies was almost as fearful as the disease itself. Bites were cauterized with red-hot irons, or filled with gunpowder and set on fire. The great French scientist, Louis Pasteur, was one of the first to take the quackery out of rabies treatment.

In 1885, a nine-year-old boy, badly bitten by a rabid dog, was inoculated with a vaccine Pasteur made from the powdered spinal cord tissue of rabies infected rabbits.

It was a qualified success for the boy did not develop rabies.

“A person who is already rabid is likely to die,” says a WHO official. “No specific anti-rabies treatment is effective once the symptoms of rabies have started.” There is no known cure so far for rabies.

But there were three documented cases of recovery. Records show that the first recovery cases from rabies occurred in 1972. A six-year-old boy developed symptoms of rabies approximately five weeks after being bitten by a rabid bat. He was hospitalized with encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and he received immediately intensive medical treatment. No anti-rabies serum or vaccine were reported used during the time symptoms were apparent, yet the patient completely recovered without any consequences.

In all three documented cases of recovery from rabies, there was only one thing in common: they had anti-rabies immunization.

Meanwhile, the continuous occurrence of rabies in the country calls for a coordinated nationwide rabies control program to reduce if not totally eradicate the disease.

The following first-aid measures should a person be bitten by a dog or any animal assumed to be rabid:

  • scrub the wound or bitten area with soap or detergent and under a running tap (water) for at least five minutes;
  • remove foreign material from the site;
  • rinse with plain water; and
  • irrigate with a viricidal agent such as alcohol or povidone iodine.

After doing so, be sure to consult a physician immediately for appropriate preventive measures.

And by the way, here's bad news for dog-eaters. Medical experts say cooking does not kill the virus. “Since rabies is a nerve-lover, it is concentrated in the brain. So, don't eat the (dog's) brain,” they cautioned.

Health | Viruses


QR Code
QR Code rabies_-_a_public_threat (generated for current page)
 

Advertise with Anonymous Ads