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Mirrorʼs Edge is one of my favorite games of all time. Itʼs a game of simplicity, a sublime experience where all excess between you and the the game environment is thrown out the window. Itʼs defenestration of the superfluous in favor of immersion, and thatʼs wholly unique for video games. Mirrorʼs Edge for iPhone is not this, but it is worthwhile in its own right. While the console iteration of Mirrorʼs Edge was a first-person experience, the iPhone iteration is a side-scrolling platformer among the likes of Canabalt, a game about fluid momentum, Mirrorʼs Edge translates extremely well to this type of gameplay, and the iPhone is a great place to execute it. On consoles Mirrorʼs Edge was somewhat difficult to control, but Mirrorʼs Edge on iPhone (ME iOS) is smooth and intuitive. To make Faith run in a direction you swipe either left or right. To make her jump, swipe up; slide, down. Itʼs a pretty simple set of commands, but the game achieves that desirable zen-like sensation of fluidity by churning these variables together and adding a handful of micro-gestures that increase how quickly Faith can traverse. Itʼs a little more complicated than something like Canabalt, where your only control is when and how long to jump, but itʼs not so complex that itʼs frustrating. ME iOS is a short experience, and no one level is completely satisfying as each is short and typically littered with a few enemy encounters, which is the gameʼs weakest aspect. Like the console version, combat in ME iOS is frustrating, a nasty road bump on an otherwise calming experience. Faith can slide, jump kick, and disarm enemies she meets by swiping either down, up, or left/right, but each option will either follow lethal gunfire, slow Faith down, or eventually kill her and end a run if failed. None of these consequences enhance the game experience, rather they detract from it. Like the Mirrorʼs Edge on consoles, ME iOS would benefit from either retooling the role of combat or doing away with it altogether, especially as it interrupts the more satisfying fluidity of the gameplay. Since this mobile version of Mirrorʼs Edge succeeds so well in delivering a calming, zen- like experience, I would have appreciated longer levels, or perhaps a mode of infinite level generation where I could just keep running and navigating. As it is, I probably wonʼt return to ME iOS simply because the levels arenʼt worth returning to once youʼve got them down. There are collectible runner bags akin to Mirrorʼs Edge on consoles, but they are frustrating to reach and donʼt really exemplify the gameʼs controls and what kind of gameplay they can achieve. Still, if you liked Mirrorʼs Edge and can find enjoyment in spurts of fluid platforming, Mirrorʼs Edge on iPhone is definitely worth checking out. 7/10


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