DEVTOME.COM HOSTING COSTS HAVE BEGUN TO EXCEED 115$ MONTHLY. THE ADMINISTRATION IS NO LONGER ABLE TO HANDLE THE COST WITHOUT ASSISTANCE DUE TO THE RISING COST. THIS HAS BEEN OCCURRING FOR ALMOST A YEAR, BUT WE HAVE BEEN HANDLING IT FROM OUR OWN POCKETS. HOWEVER, WITH LITERALLY NO DONATIONS FOR THE PAST 2+ YEARS IT HAS DEPLETED THE BUDGET IN SHORT ORDER WITH THE INCREASE IN ACTIVITY ON THE SITE IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS. OUR CPU USAGE HAS BECOME TOO HIGH TO REMAIN ON A REASONABLE COSTING PLAN THAT WE COULD MAINTAIN. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT THE DEVTOME PROJECT AND KEEP THE SITE UP/ALIVE PLEASE DONATE (EVEN IF ITS A SATOSHI) TO OUR DEVCOIN 1M4PCuMXvpWX6LHPkBEf3LJ2z1boZv4EQa OR OUR BTC WALLET 16eqEcqfw4zHUh2znvMcmRzGVwCn7CJLxR TO ALLOW US TO AFFORD THE HOSTING.

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HTML

HTML, or HyperText Mark-up Language, is the main programming language used to display information to a user via a web browser, most commonly in the form of web pages. HTML is written using HTML tags, such as <a>, <body> and <head>. All tags can be ended by repeating the tag again, but with a forward-slash at the front: For example, </a>. These tags are defined as the start tag and the end tag.

HTML tags can be used to structure a website, by breaking it into separate sections. It is also possible to create tables in HTML, using the specific tag. HTML also allows interactive forms and images to be embedded into a site, and even scripts such as those written in JavaScript.

HTML was first proposed in 1989 by the physicist Tim Berners-Lee, who wrote a memo proposing a hypertext system for the internet. In 1990, he developed the language further, wrote a browser and server software, and gave it the name HyperText Mark-up Language. HTML mark-up mostly consists of four main components: These are elements and attributes, character references, data types, and entity references.

The most common program to be made by new HTML programmers is the “infamous” Hello World program, which is simply run using the following code:

With the result of this code being depicted below:

HTML can also be linked to CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) using <link> tags, which allow the styling of a HTML document to be done separately. This can be used to save time by styling all elements in a document at once, or just be used to stop the HTML source code from being cluttered with styling tags.

The most recent version of HTML is HTML 5.0, which is currently published by the W3C Foundation. XHTML is also a separate, reformed language based off of HTML 4.01, which is still developed now. However, it is not as widely used as HTML, probably due to the favourable and early adoption of HTML in the World Wide Web.

HTML documents, like any other file, can be delivered via physical means: USB stick, Floppy Disk, or by uploading and downloading files. Despite this, they are most commonly delivered using web browsers, using HTTP, or HyperText Transfer Protocol. The filename extension .html is the most common abbreviation used for HTML documents, but despite this, the extension is sometimes shortened to .htm due to file systems being un-able to process four-letter extensions.

Criticism

Many people have criticized HTML for the lack of standards that it provides, as well as the failure of Right’s Management and Version Management. An example of this is a statement by Ted Nelson, the Information Technology Pioneer who coined the terms “Hypertext” and “Hypermedia”. Ted Nelson stated that: “HTML is precisely what we were trying to prevent - ever-breaking links, links going outward only, quotes you can't follow to their origins, no version management, no rights management.”

Missing Features

Some features of earlier HyperText systems are missing in HTML, bringing another cause for criticism. The main examples of these are Source Tracking, Fat Links, and Typed Links. However, some web browsers or services remedy this by allowing the user to: a) Edit the web-page in the browser (temporary unless saved) b) Edit the web-page through the service (permanent, reversible) An example of a) would be the ability to edit source code in Google Chrome, and an example of b) would be a wiki such as Wikipedia or Devtome.

HTML Editors

There are multiple Editors for HTML, the most common being Adobe Dreamweaver, a professional program owned by Adobe. In these editors, the user is provided with a blank template (excluding some basics such as the <!DOCTYPE HTML>, <html>, <head> and <body> tags), and required to fill in all the code themselves. This allows ultimate personalization of the web page as the user is required to create every intricate detail themselves. However, the user must have a good knowledge of HTML to use this type of editor, so it is mainly only used in professional HTML editing – for example, a professional web page.

However, there are also simpler editors, called WYSIWYG editors, or What You See Is What You Get. In editor programs such as these, the user lays out the document as it would appear in the web browser. This removes the need for any coding knowledge, as the WYSIWYG editor automatically creates the needed code. The user typically lays out the document using a GUI, or a Graphical User Interface. The WYSIWYG editor style has been heavily attacked by critics due to the extremely low quality of the code that is generated. There have been movements to change the style of the editor to WYSIWYM, or What You See Is What You Mean.

There are four major reasons that WYSIWYG editors are heavily criticized by programmers and users alike: • Bad mark-up being produced which simply copies the layout; • Producing extremely useless code, which fails to utilize the power of HTML and CSS, while completely ignoring the fact they are supposed to cascade; • Producing grammatically incorrect mark-up, also known as tag soup; • The fact that a lot of HTML information that is supposed to be in HTML documents is not included in the layout due to What You See Is What You Get nature of the editors.

Web Browsers

There are multiple Web Browsers that are usable for displaying HTML documents via HyperText Transfer Protocol. The main five web browsers, which are commonly used to display HTML documents (and various other documents, such as XHTML and PHP) are: • Internet Explorer, a web browser produced by Microsoft, which is also very controversial due to its marketing tactics with new PC’s; • Google Chrome, a web browser produced by Google, designed to be faster and lighter, which holds most of the web browser market share; • Mozilla Firefox, a web browser produced by the Mozilla Foundation, an entirely non-profit Foundation which develops Firefox to help improve the web; • Safari, a web browser produced by Apple, bundled with most new Apple PC’s; • Opera, a web browser still found on computer’s, but mainly on Smartphones such as the iPhone.

Internet


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