DEVTOME.COM HOSTING COSTS HAVE BEGUN TO EXCEED 115$ MONTHLY. THE ADMINISTRATION IS NO LONGER ABLE TO HANDLE THE COST WITHOUT ASSISTANCE DUE TO THE RISING COST. THIS HAS BEEN OCCURRING FOR ALMOST A YEAR, BUT WE HAVE BEEN HANDLING IT FROM OUR OWN POCKETS. HOWEVER, WITH LITERALLY NO DONATIONS FOR THE PAST 2+ YEARS IT HAS DEPLETED THE BUDGET IN SHORT ORDER WITH THE INCREASE IN ACTIVITY ON THE SITE IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS. OUR CPU USAGE HAS BECOME TOO HIGH TO REMAIN ON A REASONABLE COSTING PLAN THAT WE COULD MAINTAIN. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT THE DEVTOME PROJECT AND KEEP THE SITE UP/ALIVE PLEASE DONATE (EVEN IF ITS A SATOSHI) TO OUR DEVCOIN 1M4PCuMXvpWX6LHPkBEf3LJ2z1boZv4EQa OR OUR BTC WALLET 16eqEcqfw4zHUh2znvMcmRzGVwCn7CJLxR TO ALLOW US TO AFFORD THE HOSTING.

THE DEVCOIN AND DEVTOME PROJECTS ARE BOTH VERY IMPORTANT TO THE COMMUNITY. PLEASE CONTRIBUTE TO ITS FURTHER SUCCESS FOR ANOTHER 5 OR MORE YEARS!

FIRST Robotics

first.jpg

FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is a set of programs focused on promoting interest and literacy in science and engineering of children ranging in ages from elementary school through high school, thereby promoting pursuance of careers in these disciplines.

FIRST was originally founded in 1991 by inventor Dean Kamen, and has since grown into a program with multiple aspects including annual robotics competitions at three different levels; the FIRST Lego League, the FIRST Tech Challenge, and the FIRST Robotics Competition. Each of these programs is intended to target unique age/financial to allow all to experience the annual robotics challenges and unique experiences that these programs have to offer.

FIRST Robotics Competition Challenges

Each year, the FRC takes on a new form of a “game” that pits two teams of robots against one another in a semi-cooperative competitive event that inevitably requires teamwork and strategy. Prior to playing the game, teams have exactly six weeks and a limited set of funds and parts to build any robot they can (within the confines of carefully laid out rules) to fulfill the needs of that year's challenge. After this building period is over, teams compete in local regional events and winning teams ultimately take part in the annual championship match to determine the ultimate winner. In addition to awards for robot building, the FRC aims to reward cooperation and community outreach, and as a result the most prestigious awards offered by FIRST are those which reward these aspects of team development.

Below is a listing of the basic rules to previous games that have been part of the FRC. For animated videos of the game rules, sample matches, and more detailed information on rules and other aspects of the gameplay, or on the FRC in general, visit the official FIRST website.

2014 - Aerial Assist

The aerial assist game involves two teams each containing three robots. The playing field is divided into three sections, and teams earn points by scoring exercise balls into two sets of goals (low goals are worth 1 point, high goals are worth 10 points). In the center of the field is a horizontal bar. Teams earn bonus points for assisting their teammates in the effort of scoring a goal by passing the ball. In addition, bonus points can be earned by throwing a ball over the central horizontal bar, or by scoring goals and moving the robot during the initial autonomous period that occurs at the beginning of the match. Human players pass balls to robots that are on the field.

2013 - Ultimate Ascent

The Ultimate Ascent game involves two teams each containing three robots. Points are earned by shooting Frisbees into three goals at the end of the field, with higher goals being worth a greater number of points. Human players are able to pass discs to robots on the field, and can also throw discs onto the field to score additional points. At the end of the match, robots must try to climb plastic pyramids located on the field and remain suspended after the match ends. If successful, this suspension off the field earns bonus points, as does scoring points during the autonomous mode at the beginning of the match.

2012 - Rebound Rumble

The Rebound Rumble game involves two teams each containing three robots. The game is played with foam basketballs, and points are earned by shooting basketballs into four hoops located on each teams end of the field (hoops are at three different heights, and higher hoops are worth more points. Human players return scored balls to the field. In the center of the field is a short barrier with three see-saw like bridges, which robots must cross over. At the beginning of each match is a hybrid period, in which players can direct their robots to shoot baskets using the Microsoft Kinect motion sensor system. At the end of the match teams earn bonus points by finishing with their robots on the bridges, and they earn extra points if they help their opponents onto the bridge as well.

2011 - Logo Motion

The Logo Motion game involves two teams each containing three robots. The game is played with inflatable tubes shaped like pieces of the FIRST logo (red triangle, white circle, blue square). Teams earn points by placing these tubes onto scoring racks located at the opposite end of the field, with three different heights available for tube placement. Higher racks are worth more points, and points are doubled if the team manages to recreate a FIRST logo in order on a given row. During the beginning of each match is an autonomous period during which teams can try to place special yellow tubes onto the scoring rack - these “ubertubes” double the points scored for that row at the end of the match. As the match comes to a close, teams are able to deply special miniature drone robots which climb one of four large poles located in the center of the field. Teams must have their mini robots race to the top, and the first team to the top earns a bonus.

2010 - Breakaway

The Breakaway game involved two teams each containing three robots. The game is played with standard soccer balls, and the field is divided into three zones separated by large bumps containing central towers from which balls enter into play. Points are scored by shooting soccer balls into a single goal at the end of the field, and bonus points are earned by ending the match on one of the central platforms or by suspending one robot from another member of their team. Human players return scored soccer balls to the field. The match begins with an autonomous period during which teams may try to pass balls to their teammates or score without any human control. The bumps on the field are meant as a serious hazard which may require teams to build self-righting robots to combat them.

2009 - Lunacy

The Lunacy game involves two teams each containing three robots. This game is fairly unique among FRC games, in that the field is covered in a low-friction material that, in concert with the required robot wheels, simulates the effects of driving on the reduced gravity surface of the moon resulting in many high speed collisions between robots. The game is played with hollow foam balls called “moon rocks”, which must be scored in baskets being towed around the field by the opposing teams' robots. Human players are able to pass special empty cell moon rocks onto the field, which, if brought to their teams base, can be exchanged for special bonus game pieces called “super cells” which are worth bonus points. At the end of the match, human players can begin to shoot moon rocks onto the field themselves in order to gain even more additional points.

2008 - Overdrive

The Overdrive game involves two teams each containing three robots. The field is divided down the center by a metal fence, with a central overhanging rack containing four large exercise balls - two for each alliance. Each side of the field contains a “finish line” for one alliance. Teams earn points by having their robots cross their team's finish line as many times as possible while driving around the field in a single direction. Extra points are earned by pushing the exercise balls over the finish line, and by replacing them on the overhanging bar at the end of the match. During the games autonomous mode at the beginning of the match robots are able to drive around the field and receive coded directions from their teammates, and bonus points are disbursed for teams that manage to remove their exercise balls from the overpass. Additional bonus points are earned at any time the exercise balls pass over the overpass.

2007 - Rack 'n' Roll

The Rack 'n' Roll game is played by two teams each containing three robots. On the center of the field is a large scoring structure known as the rack, which contains three tiers of extensions that are used for scoring purposes. The game is played with circular inner tubes in each teams' color, and points are earned by playing these tubes in rows on the central scoring rack. Teams final scores are based on the length of unbroken rows and columns formed on the rack by their colored inner tubes. Teams can also place special black “spoiler” rings on the rack which disrupt their opponents rows. Human players are able to pass rings onto the field to robots. The match begins with an autonomous mode, during which robots can place special keeper rings on the rack that are worth bonus points at the end of the match. When the round ends, robots receive bonus points for making it back to their home zones and for being suspended off the ground, with bonus points disbursed depending on the height the robot remains off the field.

2006 - Aim High

The Aim High game is played by two teams each containing three robots. The game is played with small foam balls, and points are earned by scoring these balls in one of three goals at the opposite end of the field - two floor level goals and one high goal. Lower goals are worth 1 point each, high goals are worth three points. The game begins with an autonomous period during which robots can attempt to score using pre written instructions. During the main match, one alliance begins on offence and is able to score exclusively while the other alliance needs to defend its goals (although only two of the three defending robots can enter the opponent's score zone). Halfway through the match these roles are reversed so that the other alliance can go on the offensive. Human players can also score points by throwing balls through goals during their team's offense period. At the end of the match, robots try to climb steep ramps on their end of the field, with bonus points being earned based on the number of robots on the ramp at the end of the match.

2005 - Triple Play

The triple play game is played by two teams each containing three robots. The game is played with large plastic tetrahedrons or “tetras”. Points are earned by placing tetras on top of or under nine scoring pylons arrayed in a grid across the field a la tic tac toe. Robots earn significantly more points for creating rows of three tetras on the top of adjacent pylons (again, like tic tac toe), however the opposing alliance can place a tetra of their color on top of their opponent's tetras to disrupt their rows. At the beginning of the match robots enter an autonomous period in which they can try to score special bonus tetras using vision sensors, or can knock bonus tetras hanging under nearby pylons down for extra points. During the main match, robots can collect new tetras for their alliance from designated sites on the field, or from human players that step off pressure-sensitive pads to deactivate the robots in order to allow for tetra loading. At the end of the match, robots earn bonus points for entering the home zone of their alliance, and final scores are determined based on numbers of tetra rows claimed by each alliance.

2004 - FIRST Frenzy

The FIRST Frenzy game is played by two alliances each containing two robots. The game is played with small foam balls that must be shot into plastic PVC goals on the field by human players. Only humans can score balls, and humans can only get balls once they have been passed to them by their robots. Balls can be obtained by robots after they trigger their release by knocking over a special “keeper” ball. Robots can then direct balls to human players and move mobile PVC goals closer to human players, or move opponents mobile goals further away. The match begins with an autonomous period during which robots can attempt to score bonus points and trigger the keeper ball. As the match approaches the end, robots can pick up large 2x multiplier balls and use them to cap their goals. Doing so prevents further scoring in that goal, but doubles the point value of balls scored therein. At the end of the match, robots earn bonus points for hanging from a ten foot tall metal bar located on a central platform in the middle of the field.

2003 - Stack Attack

The Stack Attack game is played by two alliances, each containing two robots. The match is played with plastic storage crates, and points are scored by moving these stacks into each alliance's scoring zone. Final score is determined by multiplying the number of total crates in the scoring zone times the height of the tallest stack of crates in that teams scoring zone. Teams earn bonus points by ending the match on a large central ramp in the middle of the field. At the beginning of the match human players place 8 crates on the field in two stacks of chosen heights, and robots enter an autonomous period during which they attempt to grab crates from a central wall of crates on the ramp in the middle of the field.

FIRST Tech Challenge

The FIRST Tech Challenge was added to the FIRST repertoire in 2005-2006, and was originally known as the FIRST Vex Competition. The FTC relies on teams using a smaller kit of parts curated by FIRST to build smaller robots to complete challenges similar to those created as part of the FRC. The aim of the FTC was to make robotics more accessible and more affordable to schools and students that may have lacked access to the corporate resources that teams need to compete in an FRC competition. Below is a listing of previous FIRST Tech/Vex challenges.

2006 - Hangin' Around

The Hangin' Around game is played by two teams of two robots each. The game is played with small softballs, that robots must try to sore in two goals located on each team's side of the field. Teams can double their scores by moving a large “Atlas” ball onto their side of the field, provided it is there at the end of the match. At the end of the game, teams receive bonus points if the robots are located on a central spinning platform, and even more points are earned if robots are able to hang suspended from a bar in the center of the field.

2007 - Quad Quandry

The Quad Quandry game is played by two teams of two robots each. The field is covered with foam tiles and is split into four quadrants, two for each team opposite each other. There are four goal strutures - two single movable goals, and two linked goals that are movable and attached by an elevated cross bar. The match is played using plastic rings, 50 per team, and points are scored by placing these rings on either the bases of the movable or on the posts that extend from these goals. Robots also earn bonus points if their team has scored the most points at the end of the autonomous period that begins the match.

2008 - Face Off

The Face Off game is played by two teams of two robots each. The field is covered in foam, with two areas of rough terrain and two areas of slippery terrain. In the center of the field is three tiered scoring structure made of clear plastic. The game is played with colored hockey pucks for each alliance, which can be scored in any of the tiers of the central scoring structure, with the elevated central tiers being worth more points. Hockey pucks are collected from rotating racks located throughout the field, and one robot on each team begins the match at the top of a spring loaded ramp. Robots earn bonus points if they score hockey pucks during autonomous mode and those pucks remain in the goal for the rest of the match.

2009 - Hot Shot

The Hot Shot game is played by two teams of two robots each. The game is played with white wiffle balls, and there are four special yellow bonus balls as well. In the center of the field is a central goal that contains a low floor level scoring area and a high elevated goal that can be rotated using an attached pivot bar. Robots earn points by scoring in these goals, and in addition during the last 30 seconds of the match robots may shoot balls into an off field goal for more points. Balls come from ball dispensing chutes, which robots must activate, and bonus balls enter play through these chutes in the last 30 seconds of the game. Robots earn bonus points for activating a ball shoot during the autonomous period at the start of the match, or by scoring balls during this period of time.

2010 - Get Over It!

The Get Over It! game is played by two teams of two robots each. The game is played with PVC batons colored for each team, 50 per team. Four batons randomly contain magnets, and there are also four total doubler batons. The field contains a central mountain as well as two bridges that pivot to allow robots to cross over the field. Each team has corrugated goal at the bottom of a “cliff” and two movable goals containing five scoring pipes. At the end of the autonomous period, robots earn bonus points for ending the period on a cliff, a mountain, or a bridge. Extra points are earned for balancing the bridge, and for releasing batons from the baton dispenser. During the match, robots earn points for placing batons in their team's goals. Normal batons placed in the center of the movable goals are not worth any points, but magnetic batons placed in these goals are worth a huge bonus. At the end of the game, teams earn bonus points based on how many of their robots and goals are balanced on their team's bridge.

2011 - Bowled Over

The Bowled Over game is played with two teams of two robots each. The game is played with 100 racquet balls, 12 of which contain hidden magnets inside. In addition there are two 6 pound bowling balls on the field, one for each team, and there are six scoring crates per team as well. During the autonomous mode, robots earn points for flipping over scoring crates, moving to designated parking zones, moving a bowling ball into these parking zones, and knocking over racquet balls from on top of scoring goals. Racquet balls are scored in the teams scoring crates. Magnet balls can be scored in a special off field goal for massive bonus points. Teams earn extra points for scoring balls in crates and then stacking these crates, with higher stacks being worth more points. At the end of the match, teams earn extra points for moving their bowling ball to the top of a ramp located in their game area.

References


QR Code
QR Code first_robotics (generated for current page)
 

Advertise with Anonymous Ads