DEVTOME.COM HOSTING COSTS HAVE BEGUN TO EXCEED 115$ MONTHLY. THE ADMINISTRATION IS NO LONGER ABLE TO HANDLE THE COST WITHOUT ASSISTANCE DUE TO THE RISING COST. THIS HAS BEEN OCCURRING FOR ALMOST A YEAR, BUT WE HAVE BEEN HANDLING IT FROM OUR OWN POCKETS. HOWEVER, WITH LITERALLY NO DONATIONS FOR THE PAST 2+ YEARS IT HAS DEPLETED THE BUDGET IN SHORT ORDER WITH THE INCREASE IN ACTIVITY ON THE SITE IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS. OUR CPU USAGE HAS BECOME TOO HIGH TO REMAIN ON A REASONABLE COSTING PLAN THAT WE COULD MAINTAIN. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT THE DEVTOME PROJECT AND KEEP THE SITE UP/ALIVE PLEASE DONATE (EVEN IF ITS A SATOSHI) TO OUR DEVCOIN 1M4PCuMXvpWX6LHPkBEf3LJ2z1boZv4EQa OR OUR BTC WALLET 16eqEcqfw4zHUh2znvMcmRzGVwCn7CJLxR TO ALLOW US TO AFFORD THE HOSTING.

THE DEVCOIN AND DEVTOME PROJECTS ARE BOTH VERY IMPORTANT TO THE COMMUNITY. PLEASE CONTRIBUTE TO ITS FURTHER SUCCESS FOR ANOTHER 5 OR MORE YEARS!

Efficiency is not money-making

Happiness is neither pleasure, nor material possessions, nor money, but simply growth. Man is happy not when he has a fat bank balance, but when he steadily grows in efficiency.

As the oft-heard axiom goes, money is a good servant, but a bad master. If we have money we feel secure, we can fulfill our and our dependants' needs, we can use it to educate ourselves and others, we can live in a way befitting human dignity. That means, money is very useful to improve our personal efficiency. But if money has us, we become like the flies which so much gorge themselves with food that they are not able to move and soon die. Personal efficiency remains close to zero.

Alexander the Great, when asked why he did not gather and lay up money, said, 'For fear, lest being its keeper, I should be infected and corrupted.'

Benjamin Franklin says, 'Money never made a man happy yet, nor will it. There is nothing in its nature to produce happiness. The more a man has, the more he wants. Instead of its filling a vacuum, it makes one. If it satisfies one want, it doubles and trebles that want another way. That was a true proverb of the wise man, rely upon it: Better is little with the fear of the Lord than great treasure and trouble therewith.'

Swami Vivekananda pinpoints that the trend of equating success and happiness with money spinning is an attitude which does not always lead man toward real success.

He says: 'How some people give all their energies, time, brain, body, and everything to become rich! They have no time for breakfast! Early in the morning they are out, and at work! They die in the attempt - ninety percent of them - and the rest when they make money cannot enjoy it. That is grand!

'I do not say it is bad to try to be rich. It is marvelous, wonderful. Why, what does it show?

It shows that one can have the same amount of energy and struggle for freedom, as one has for money. We know we have to give up money and all other things when we die, and yet, see the amount of energy we can put forth for them. But we, the same human beings, should we not put forth a thousand-fold more strength and energy to acquire that which never fades, but which remains with us forever? For this is the one great friend our own good deeds, our own spiritual excellence, that follows us beyond the grave.'

Preserve your freedom

Billy: So your new job makes you independent?

Jim: Absolutely. I get there any time I want before nine, and I leave just when I please after five.

During one of the great California forest fires, a young executive left his office to race to his foothill home and rescue what he might.

Along the highway, where the road turned off into the hills, he met his wife. She informed him that the fire was a few hundred yards from their barn, but their home was sure to be destroyed. Upon arrival, he told her to let out the dog and the cat from the house while he ran to free the horses from their stables. When his wife returned to his side, she asked, 'What shall we save now?' And the man said, 'Nothing.'

Back on the highway, the man explained that on the drive to the home he had been anxiously cataloguing in his mind all of the possessions which he must rescue from the blaze. Before reaching his wife, he had decided that they had a duty to the living creatures, the horses, dog and cat, but that all of the rest was unimportant.

'We don't need things to be happy,' he told his wife. 'We must not lose our freedom to things.'

So they drove back to the city, took a room in a hotel and waited for the fire to be brought under control. When they returned to their home, they found that the wind had averted the fire but a few yards from their home. Their house and all of their possessions were intact. 'Perhaps if I had tried to save those things,' the man said later, 'I should have lost them all – God's way of showing me their unimportance.'

A certain detachment from possessions and from the fruits of your labor gives more incentive to efficiency. These things are not too important in themselves. Man needs nothing to be happy, for happiness is found more within than without.

How to fight inefficiency

Inefficiency can be due to a number of reasons. For instance, poor health, lack of education, uncontrolled emotion, poor family life and social communication, and not the least, worry and anxiety.

The best method to effectively combat all these obstacles is to outline a tentative schedule and adhere to it as far as possible by conscious concentration.

Therefore, timings are important if you wish to run things smoothly and efficiently.

And besides, will and determination.

'Say, I've got a great idea for a new invention.'

'What's it?'

‘A lawnmower that doesn't need any petrol or electricity.'

'What makes it run?'

'All you have to do is push it.'

In overcoming inefficiency you may find great help in books, in intelligent discussion and planning with your friends and associates, but finally you have to go back to the same old way and resources: will and determination. Theodore Roosevelt writes 'There are two kinds of success.'

'One is the very rare kind that comes to the man who has power to do what no one else has the power to do. That is genius.

'But the average man who wins what we call success is not a genius. He is a man who has merely the ordinary qualities that he shares with his fellows, but who has developed those ordinary qualities to a more than ordinary degree.'

Avoid a dog's life

A farmer had just returned from a drive in his carriage. His dog came and threw himself on the grass, panting for breath.

“Tain't the road that tires him,' said the farmer, 'but the zigzagging. The horse has gone only ten miles, while he has gone fifty. There wasn't a gate open on the way he didn't go in and examine the whole premises. There wasn't a cat appeared but that he had to chase it. There wasn't a dog barked but that he wore himself out barking and showing fight. No, 'tain't the straight travelling that tires him. It is the zigzagging.'

To get lost in sidetracks is waste of energy. Many people simply waste themselves out because they don't know what they want. They just want to kill time in the most comfortable way, so twenty four hours after twenty-four hours disappear without making them any the better.

It is very essential that anyone who wants to be efficient must know what exactly he wants.

Once he knows this he can drop all superfluities and trek the bee-line to his target.

Moving around in circle is not living. Yet this is what most people do most of the time.

'For some housewives,' says Dr. Stephen Lackner, 'the cleanliness and orderliness of the home is an end in itself. Their interminable toil does not even earn them any appreciation and doesn't leave them any time for genuine culture. Still, they cannot bring themselves to be a little more easy-going in their housework; the sparkle has become their fetish.'

If you want an efficient and fruitful life, avoid vagueness, carelessness and hasty estimates. Do away with all useless steps and rationalize your activities.

In everything know your mind and stick to it. It will save you many a headache. You will understand better what life is worth and make the most of it.

Make your personal decision

The flight of Gemini 4 had been planned to establish a record of permanence in space. But soon after the capsule was in orbit, the fuel cells malfunctioned and it became apparent that the flight might have to be immediately called off because the lives of the two astronauts were in serious danger.

On the one side the safety of two men, and on the other, the prestige of his country - these were the alternatives between which flight director Christopher Kraft had to choose within the space of a few minutes.

He alertly glanced at the reports on his table from all the relay stations around the world, he examined the data of the computers, he asked with a look the opinion of the experts around him, he spoke briefly on the radio with the astronauts themselves, and at the precise instant announced his decision: It's a go!

The flight was a success and a new record was established.

Machines give blind service. It is man's decision that shapes his life.

A hesitating, wavering, undecided policy is found in individuals as well as in families. The undecided man cannot bring himself to a focus. He dissipates his energies and accomplishes nothing.

An important ingredient of efficiency is decisions. All our life is a series of decisions: decisions between doing and being something or not doing or being it, decisions between doing and being this or that. But decide we must, because unless we decide, we do not get anywhere. An undecided man is like the eighteenth-century statesman A. G. Gardiner spoke about, who used to find it so difficult to make a choice that he would stand at his door looking up the street and down, and finally go inside again, because he could not decide whether to go up or down. He spent his morning undecided, and in the afternoon he felt sorry that he had done neither one thing nor the other.

Move up, today

Many men want to be efficient, but because they are afraid of the pinch of effort, they say, 'All right. I'll start tomorrow.' But that tomorrow never comes.

Mahatma Gandhi said, 'Men often hesitate to make a beginning, because they feel that the objective cannot be achieved in its entirety. This attitude of mind is precisely our greatest obstacle to progress – an obstacle that each man, if only he wills it, can clear away.'

The quest for efficiency is a long journey we start out on, so it must begin with the first step. It is accomplished step by step, and if we can bring ourselves to - and all of us can - take one step at a time we advance toward the goal slowly but surely. But unless we take the first step we cannot expect to be any nearer the goal. So the decision must be, to move up one step, today.

Focus on contribution

Young and old have been thrilled by the words of John F. Kennedy, 'My fellow citizens, ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.'

The efficient man focuses on contribution. He looks up toward the goals. He turns the attention away from his narrow interests, his own department, toward the performance of the whole.

Ask yourself: What can I contribute to the family, to the office, to the firm for which I work and by which I am paid?

The later years have shown great results and progress, but neither the increase in productivity, nor the increase in profitability - the two yardsticks that measure economic results - has shown marked acceleration. No matter how well some individual and the society have done, the job of making the worker productive is still ahead. The key to it is efficiency. Commitment to contribution is commitment to efficiency.

Rewards of risking it

'It's not easy to get ahead in this world,' a businessman assured a young friend. 'As a lad I started out at the bottom. I struggled, worked, sweated, took risks, climbing the ladder of life hand over hand, rung by rung.'

The friend interposed, 'And now you are a great success?'

'Well, no,' grinned the other, 'but I'm getting mighty good at climbing ladders!'

To be efficient means to be able to take risks. It is most important in making decisions, crossing new frontiers of knowledge, accepting responsibility for discovering who we are and what we can do.

John Kord Lagemann writes: 'Intelligent risk-taking has nothing to do with bravado and foolhardiness, or with impulse and dumb luck. The constructive risk is always based on heart and preparation and guided by reason. This does not diminish the courage required to take risk…. You don't have to wait for emergencies or momentous occasions to learn the art of risk-taking. You can practice it daily by standing up for what you believe by making firm decisions instead of procrastinating, by doing something you always wanted to do and never dared. The rewards of such practice in risk-taking are greater self-confidence and insight, more rewarding relationships with others, and a more vivid and effective personality.

Risk-taking is what keeps man growing and reaching satisfaction. As Bernard Shaw said, 'I dread success. To have succeeded is to have finished one's business on earth, like the male spider, who is killed by the female the moment he has succeeded in his courtship. I like a state of continued becoming, with a goal in front and not behind.'

Where efficiency comes from

The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

Bernard Shaw said, 'A man learns to skate by staggering about, making a fool of himself.'

Many fail to achieve efficiency at school as well as at work because they are terrified by the possibility of failure or ridicule and so they deprive themselves of pleasures, adventure or just plain fun by being too concerned with what people will think.

Mistakes are not only an acceptable part of life; they are essential to a full life.

Samuel Smiles, whose books offered guidance to people all over the world for the last century, wrote, 'It is true, the best of men may fail, in the best of causes. But even these best of men did not try to fail, or regard their failure as meritorious; on the contrary they tried to succeed, and looked upon failure as misfortune.

'Failure in any good cause is, however, honorable while success in any bad cause is merely infamous. At the same time success in the good cause is unquestionably better than failure.

'But it is not the result in any case that is to be regarded so much as the aim and the effort, the patience, the courage, and the endeavor with which desirable and worthy objects are pursued.'

'Tis not in mortals to command success, We will do more - deserve it.

The falling drops at last will wear the stone

Timur or Tamerlane, prince of the Tartars, ardently wished to become the conqueror of the world.

But he lost the first battle, had to flee, and for days hid himself in some old ruins.

In despair he brooded over his misfortune.

Then he saw an ant with a load climbing the wall. The ant came to a projecting rock and fell down.

Immediately it picked up its load and tried again. Down it went headlong.

With great attention Tamerlane kept watching the little ant and counted the times it fell down. He noted it fell down seventy times.

At the seventy-first trial the ant succeeded in climbing over the protruded rock.

The prince of the Tartars felt refreshed with the extraordinary grit and success of the creature and said aloud to himself:

'I was defeated only once and I have already lost courage. I am going to learn from the ant. Even though I should be defeated seventy times, the seventy-first time I shall be victorious.'

And he did win victory after victory then on.

In all who succeed in life we find three characteristics:

1. Perseverance. They are not discouraged by failures. If they fall, they recover themselves without delay.

2. Cheerfulness and confidence. They know how to look at everything from its best side. They are always hopeful about the future and confident of success.

3. Single-mindedness. They keep the end in view steadily before them.

The best is the enemy of efficiency

A person who is never content with anything less than the best may end up by accomplishing little or nothing.

He is like a sculptor who, having carved a fine statue, was dissatisfied with his work. Hence he made one cut more with his chisel. This necessitated another cut, and this in turn still another.

Gradually the statue diminished in size, until finally it had disappeared with nothing left but a pile of fragments.

Whether you are carving a statue, writing a book, arranging a business deal, or scrubbing the floor, there must be a time for you to say, 'It is good enough,' and get on to something else.

Efficiency, like diplomacy, is the art of the possible. Learn to concentrate on doing your work today, and under the circumstances in which you find yourself.

Perfectionism is the enemy of efficiency.

In anything you attempt there will always be someone better at it than you are. Impossible standards of perfection may bleed you of your peace of mind. The sooner you accept the fact that you are less than perfect, the sooner you can get on with your goals.

Society | Self-Help


QR Code
QR Code efficiency_is_not_money-making (generated for current page)
 

Advertise with Anonymous Ads