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Culinary Revolution At Home

A revolution is brewing in the Filipino kitchen. Food, today's consumers believe, is something not only eaten to quash out hunger. Many food buyers rightfully think food must be a source of good nutrition and total well-being.

Let's find out how Del Monte workers have brought about this culinary evolution and revolution in their homes by using Del Monte products to add spice, cheer and good health to the Yuletide Season.

Lutong bahay. From our Malayan roots, Filipinos got much of our islander cuisine. Ganggang or sugba (grill), sangag (roast), kilaw (done raw or salad-style), un-un (pickle), tola (stew), gisa (saute). These are some of our favorite folksy ways of doing lutong bahay (food cooked at home) using fresh picks from the farm, just the way our grandmothers did “orig” and “secret” recipes passed on to daughters and sons over the years.

lnato lang. Workers at our plantation in Bukidnon and cannery in Misamis Oriental have brought to Del Monte their own unique cooking traditions from their own hometowns. For more than 80 years now, streams of migrants from neighboring provinces in Mindanao, Bohol and other Visayan islands, and even from Luzon, have given a new flavor to Bukidnon's lumad (native) cuisine with their inato lang (homey) recipes.

Innovators at hearth. lnato meals served in the homes of our workers have evolved with new ingredients dipped into a pot of soup or garnished over a salad bowl, giving old favorites a new taste and healthier food for a growing family. Kitchen innovations were made easy with Del Monte's pineapple and tomato products, pasta and condiments available at cooperative stores in Plantation camps and at the cannery and at sarisari stores.

Cawayanon cuisine. Del Monte's community of expatriate and Filipino executive families based in Cawayanon have also spiced up our cooking tradition with American and European fine dining menus. These recipes have been compiled by the Del Monte Ladies Civic Association into the very popular DELCA Cook Book.

Pista sa baryo. The fiesta is a special time to welcome family and friends to your home as well as showcase family recipes. For Cannery Preparation worker Vivian Rojas, fiesta at their home in San Martin, Villanueva (Misamis Oriental) is not complete without hamonada cooked the way her father Leocadio Taquiang, now 74 years old and mother, Cannery Sanitation retiree Teresita, taught her. Her recipe comes cheap on the pocket, simple to cook, and “tastes great with Del Monte catsup for sawsawan!”

Kumbira. Fiestas are not the only big events in barrio life. A kumbira literally showcases a food feast cooked up for the family. Take the case of pineapple field worker Marvin Payot, 32, and his family, who lives right next door to his father and Plantation co-worker Benito, 57, in Camp JMC. Sharing a backyard makes it easy for family cooks Marvin and papa Ben to heat up a wood-fired stove for their favorite kaldereta.

“Hot” challenge. Our workers and their families have not stopped experimenting on new dishes in the kitchen. Del Monte fruit, mixed fruits and beverages that were once served only for dessert are now commonly used as recipe ingredients. Del Monte's culinary products (pasta, sauces, ketchups, vinegar, recipe mixes and marinades) have become mainstream kitchen fare.

Foodies' war. The “revolution” kicked off by Del Monte continues as we gain new adherents in and out of the kitchen. Our products have come out of the kitchen and found its way into food service chains, health spas and gyms, school and office cafeterias, hospitals, and on backpacks of nature trippers.

“Lami kaayo!” The Payot family serves up Plantation's best kaldereta cooked up by Papa Ben and son Marvin. Helping out are cousin Randy, Ben's youngest son John Phillips, Ben's wife and Packing Shed retiree Margie, and Marvin's wife Marivic and daughter Czarena Ysabelle.

Celebrating family ties and friendships. Vivian Rojas joins father Cadie,mama Terry, sister and co-Cannery worker Marvie, daughter Michelle and cousins during their pista sa baryo.

At Home In The Kitchen

Del Monte families love good food and know how to dish out a good meal. Our workers show us how old time favorites can become delicious masterpieces.

Bitoy's kinilaw. This TESDA national awardee for mechanical fabrication is as good in the kitchen as he is at the machine shop. Albert Diaz, fondly called Bitoy or Toy-bits by family and friends, cooks up his “special kinilaw”for his barkada during offwork sessions. He spares nothing to come up with this kitchen masterpiece - fresh malasuge cuts plus Del Monte pineapple chunks and vinegar. Friends say he is a meticulous cook, and no matter what he serves on a platter, it always tastes good.

Yummy baked spaghetti. Corporate Quality Assurance senior food analyst Edna Soliven-Buscato recently gifted her husband Rupert his favorite Baked Spaghetti. For this “labor of love,” done specially for his birthday, Edna used a recipe she developed years back with Del Monte Pasta and Italian Style spaghetti sauce and layered with “secret” bechamel (white sauce).”Yummy !”Their children Daniel and Faith say.

Heavenly “pineapple float” Cooking time is bonding time for Preparation capataz Betalina Lague, husband Nelson (a ginaca mechanic) and children Sharina Gabrielle and Leon Neil Anthony. Together, they recently dished up a “pineapple float,” beautifully blending layers of Del Monte crushed pineapple, graham crackers and cream. While others may find cooking chores difficult, it gives Allyn a relaxing break from peak canning days.

Pinakasweet pastries. Helen Comique-Rebucal, wife of Land Preparation worker Eldy Rebocal, has made quite a name at the plantation baking “the best” pineapple and fruit cocktail bar, roll, stick, tart and pinadita (empanada with pineapple filling).She uses Del Monte fresh and canned pineapple for her pastries. Her home-based business got its name from the PineCoop “Pinakasweets” Contest award she got.

Salpicao at the Fort. Treasury supervisor Ann Ilagan always looks forward to Friday lunch at the Fort. It's not only chika time but a good time to share home-made meals with friends. Jo-Ann Maluenda, Carmela Vilar and other Friday Club members from our Metro-Manila Finance, Administrative and Executive Offices, who are all avid cooks, rate Ann's salpicao as the Club's 5-star recipe.

Noche Buena. We reserve our very best recipes for Noche Buena. During the Christmas Season, Del Monte Lodge cook Joaquin Fudolin, and Rey Macuse, prepare the quintessential noche buena, the Del Monte Ham.

Dine-out or “bring-house”. Our workers find “bring home” food the easiest and fastest way to dine. Ask Sol Casino-Pizarro, Cannery Cafeteria Operations supervisor, who'll tell you orders for pasalubong or tinabuan (food to bring home) and binalot or pinutos (take-out) keep her kitchen staff really busy. Of course, Del Monte products come in handy on her yummy salads and filling entrees.

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