DEVTOME.COM HOSTING COSTS HAVE BEGUN TO EXCEED 115$ MONTHLY. THE ADMINISTRATION IS NO LONGER ABLE TO HANDLE THE COST WITHOUT ASSISTANCE DUE TO THE RISING COST. THIS HAS BEEN OCCURRING FOR ALMOST A YEAR, BUT WE HAVE BEEN HANDLING IT FROM OUR OWN POCKETS. HOWEVER, WITH LITERALLY NO DONATIONS FOR THE PAST 2+ YEARS IT HAS DEPLETED THE BUDGET IN SHORT ORDER WITH THE INCREASE IN ACTIVITY ON THE SITE IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS. OUR CPU USAGE HAS BECOME TOO HIGH TO REMAIN ON A REASONABLE COSTING PLAN THAT WE COULD MAINTAIN. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT THE DEVTOME PROJECT AND KEEP THE SITE UP/ALIVE PLEASE DONATE (EVEN IF ITS A SATOSHI) TO OUR DEVCOIN 1M4PCuMXvpWX6LHPkBEf3LJ2z1boZv4EQa OR OUR BTC WALLET 16eqEcqfw4zHUh2znvMcmRzGVwCn7CJLxR TO ALLOW US TO AFFORD THE HOSTING.

THE DEVCOIN AND DEVTOME PROJECTS ARE BOTH VERY IMPORTANT TO THE COMMUNITY. PLEASE CONTRIBUTE TO ITS FURTHER SUCCESS FOR ANOTHER 5 OR MORE YEARS!

Concern For Your Basic Needs

The myth of modern man does not do away with the truth that man always remains essentially the same with regard to his moral obligation, his need of redemption and the true sources of happiness. Man, as such, always lacks of some positive good. He always lacks of something required for an adequate adjustment and efficiency. Man is complex and needs many things.

Psychologists speak of different basic needs. Freud said that man wants most of all to be loved. Adler, that he wants most of all to be significant. Jung, that he wants security.

A need is the lack of some good. If we consider it in the philosophical sense, good is something that fits to ones nature, either because it is suitable or because it is necessary – something which completes or perfects a person.

The need may be physiological, psychological, social or religious. The satisfaction of material needs is more of an economic and political problem than the psychological. While it is not always in our power and ability to satisfy the former, much depends upon our efficiency, maturity and inner growth to satisfy, possess and enjoy the latter – psychological, social and religious needs.

Material needs

Man for the development of his personality needs adequate food, adequate housing, adequate rest and recreation, economic autonomy and security and physical health. These are basic necessities without which we can barely say that man lives a human life and their satisfaction is a matter of daily concern to each of us.

Failure to satisfy some of the material needs may affect our health – bodily and mental, even result in death. Of course, the solution to many of these problems depends also on man's mental, moral and spiritual outlook.

Basic psychological needs

Many people are unaware of the emotions that might be responsible for their inefficiency. They frequently have emotions of a wrong variety because the basic psychological needs are neglected.

Psychological needs are many and diverse. Generally they are numbered up to 13, but they can be reduced to six basic needs. Perhaps they are more important than the material for the proper adjustment and efficiency of a person. Failure to satisfy any of these needs may disturb mental health and affect efficiency both at home and at work.

To know them may help for a better and deeper study of yourself and may afford an easier path to their fulfillment.

The principal basic needs are:

1. The need for security: to feel secure, safe and at ease.

2. The need for love: to love others and be loved.

3. The need for creativity: to be creative, not only of material things but of new life, the need for new experience, for new adventure and to satisfy curiosity.

Man's need for security is a basic need and without it he can hardly be efficient in his work.

You feel secure if there is enough income to buy at least the necessities of life now and in the years to come, if your life is protected by a just government, if you are relatively sure that you will not be struck down by a disease, if you are loved and wanted by the people around you. Another element in security is confidence in one's own ability to solve problems and stand alone in the face of adversity.

Because complete security is an impossible thing, Jesus Christ has warned us well in time, 'Let not your hearts be troubled.'

For normal healthy man's security rests mainly on a scale of values, a philosophy of life.

By scale of values or philosophy of life, we mean simply a set of ideas, truths, beliefs and principles that guide a person in his thinking, in his attitudes and relations to himself and others, in his perspective regarding reality, his social, moral and religious behavior.

It is obvious to anyone who has taken religion seriously, how true faith in God has provided him with such a set of ideas, truths, and principles guiding his thinking and behavior with regard to his own life and his relations with others.

Man's search for meaning is a primary need in his life. There is an increasing number of people to whom life appears meaningless, who feel an inner emptiness, an uncertainty as to what life is all about. Deprived of any real meaning, their lives lack direction and purpose; they often finish up in real hopelessness, mental Illness and despair. This state of mind has been called the “existential vacuum of the twentieth century and is behind a lot of alcoholism, juvenile delinquency finding its typical product m the hippie movements of modern youth. It can be compensated for in the forms of the will to power, money, position, or in the will to pleasure of which sexual compensation is one form…. When a man, in finding faith in depth thereby finds the meaning of life, he realizes that his faith does not turn him away from the world, but toward it. He does not turn his back upon his fellows, for he knows that he is closer to them. In discovering life’s meaning, he discovers his fellowman.

The need for creative expression

No one is happy if he is not being constructive in his leisure hours or in his work. It is natural for everyone to identify himself with the world and to become part of it in order to build it up to transform and make it livable.

Most of us keep on cleaning, repairing, patching up what would, if left untended, fall apart.

Just like the story of a history teacher. She was not content with merely teaching her subject, but she was also interested in each of her pupils. She would invite them to visit her, she initiated them to the joys of the intellectual work. But since she lived only for her work, the prospect of retirement looked like a terrible threat even many years before it arrived.

When the dreaded event finally arrived, she no longer knew what to do. She withdrew from society and stayed at home all day long, alone. No longer outgoing and charming, she was melancholy, she let the housework go, she spent the whole day dressed in an old bathrobe and slippers. A few months later she died from a bad case of flu. All those who knew her best thought that she had simply let herself die because life had no more meaning for her and she felt that she was no more wanted.

This basic human tendency (to create) manifests itself on many levels. It is, of course most obvious on the purely physic plane. The desire to project the gift of life into the future through the generative process is characteristic of all normal human beings.

This creative process involves a dignity which indeed makes man, resemble his own Creator and fills him with the intellectual, moral and spiritual joy of communicating not merely existence, but existence of a sublime order.

Every man has the need to use his energies and powers in creative work. Whether it be in the area of agriculture or mechanical labor or craftsmanship or office activity or, in the case of women, the development and enrichment of home, there is no man or woman who can find true happiness if creativity is thwarted.

Deliberate frustration of this basic need creates many conflicts. Man always has something he can create, something about himself he can put right. Physical, mental and spiritual repair jobs are constantly required.

“Set not your goal too near at hand, Lest it be early won, And you, content with some small aim, Leave greater tasks undone. No great ship on its outbound way. But seeks some harbor far; And every hill, however high, Looks upward to a star.” - Frances Crosby Hamlet

The need for recognition

Psychoanalysts and psychologists confirm that just approbation and sincere praise are essential to the progress, well-being and efficiency of every man.

All of us expect credit for the good we do and we yearn for recognition of our merits. We feel dejected when these are denied to us. This may happen in many ways as m the case of a worker who is fired by his boss or in the case of one who is 'told off' by his friends. Such situations are difficult to endure. A feeling of bitterness and emptiness overcomes us. In despair some may even take very drastic steps.

Readers of Indian dailies were shocked to read about the suicide of Dr. Vinod Shah, a scientist of the IARI. According to the note he left, he sacrificed his life so that other scientists in India might get 'better treatment.' This man was looking for recognition not only for himself but for his colleagues as well.

Hans Christian Andersen, recalling the way in which he had been criticized when young, said, 'Blame stumps me. Praise encourages me and makes me cling to God.'

People feel niggardly because often their efforts are not recognized, or esteem and praise are doled out at home, in school, in industry and in society. But give them sincere praise and you will see their efficiency soar.

The need for identity

On my visits to a slum area, I often saw an old lady who was living all alone. Everyone could immediately notice that there was something different about her. Though dirt and filth lay all around, she kept herself and her little hut very neat and clean.

Out of curiosity I asked her how she succeeded in keeping everything in order and clean in such a place.

'Well, it is only a question of self-respect, you know.' There was real pride in her voice.

Evidently she had constructed for herself a citadel of self-respect in the midst of despair and decay. Physically she had been consigned to the slum, but psychologically and spiritually she had risen far above it.

Identity means ability to accept discipline and authority. Both are essential to mental health. This does not mean subservience but submission to properly constituted authority.

Identity means ability to accept the other people. The life of every human being is a part of our own. It was Dostoevsky who said, 'Each of us is responsible for everything to everyone else.'

Discipline and submission to authority must be learned in childhood if we want to be at ease to control impulses and to accept discipline at home as well as at work.

It is discipline which corrects the baseness of wordly passions, fortifies the heart with virtuous principles, enlightens the mind with useful knowledge, furnishes it with enjoyment from within itself, and is of more consequence to real felicity, than all the provisions we can make of the goods of fortune.

People have been known to resort to every artifice to find out what their friends and admirers think and say of them.

“More than fame and more than money. It is the comment kind and sunny, And the hearty, warm approval of a friend; For it gives to life a savor, And it makes us stronger, braver, Yes, it gives us heart and courage to the end. If he earns your praise, bestow it! If you like him, like him now! Let the words of true encouragement be said, Do not wait till life is over, And he's underneath the clover, For he cannot read the tombstone when he's dead.” – Berton Brayley

Be quick to praise and slow to censure, and you will be surprised at the change in your home, office or in the factory.

Among the smaller duties of life, I hardly know any one more important than that of not praising where praise is not due.

“Reputation is one of the prizes for which men contend: it produces more labor and more talent than twice the wealth of a country could ever rear up. It is the coin of genius, and it is the imperious duty of every man to bestow it with the most scrupulous justice and the wisest economy.” – Sydney Smith

The need for God.

'The greatest question of our times,' said Will Durant, the popular philosopher, 'is not communism versus individualism, not Europe versus America, not even the East versus the West; it is whether man can bear to live without God.'

It is said that Rudyard Kipling, when desperately sick and burning with fever, tossed to and fro on his bed and mumbled words which no one could quite understand. One morning a nurse bent over him and asked, 'Mr. Kipling, what is it that you want?'

The poet ceased his restlessness, opened his weary eyes and feebly whispered, 'I want God.'

Religion is not essentially an antidote to inefficiency but a remedy for it and a protection against moral and psychic disorder.

One day, a young man irritatedly slammed a door in Abraham Lincoln's face. Recovering himself, he said, 'I'm sorry, Mr. Lincoln, I'm just upset today.’

Lincoln put a kindly hand on the man's shoulder and said, 'Young man, why don't you stop fighting God on the inside?'

Many times we fight God on the inside and turn to fight everyone on the outside.

Only religion and true faith in the living God can give meaning to life and death, work, hardships and suffering. Only religion has the power to make the inevitable constraints of morality bearable and even elevating by making them interior.

Gilbert Burnet writes, 'By living according to the rules of religion, a man becomes the wisest, the best, and the happiest creature that he is capable of being.

'Honesty, industry, the employing of time well, a constant sobriety, are the best preservatives, too, of life and health.'

Religion puts man in communion and in dialogue with God through prayer. And prayer, writes H. W. Beecher, 'covers the whole of a man's life. There is no thought, feeling, yearning, or desire, however low, trifling we may deem it, which, if it affects our real interest or happiness, we may not lay before God and be sure of his sympathy.

'His nature is such that our often corning does not tire him. The whole burden of the whole life of every man may be rolled on to God and not weary him, though it has wearied the man.'

Society | Self-Help


QR Code
QR Code concern_for_your_basic_needs (generated for current page)
 

Advertise with Anonymous Ads