DEVTOME.COM HOSTING COSTS HAVE BEGUN TO EXCEED 115$ MONTHLY. THE ADMINISTRATION IS NO LONGER ABLE TO HANDLE THE COST WITHOUT ASSISTANCE DUE TO THE RISING COST. THIS HAS BEEN OCCURRING FOR ALMOST A YEAR, BUT WE HAVE BEEN HANDLING IT FROM OUR OWN POCKETS. HOWEVER, WITH LITERALLY NO DONATIONS FOR THE PAST 2+ YEARS IT HAS DEPLETED THE BUDGET IN SHORT ORDER WITH THE INCREASE IN ACTIVITY ON THE SITE IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS. OUR CPU USAGE HAS BECOME TOO HIGH TO REMAIN ON A REASONABLE COSTING PLAN THAT WE COULD MAINTAIN. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT THE DEVTOME PROJECT AND KEEP THE SITE UP/ALIVE PLEASE DONATE (EVEN IF ITS A SATOSHI) TO OUR DEVCOIN 1M4PCuMXvpWX6LHPkBEf3LJ2z1boZv4EQa OR OUR BTC WALLET 16eqEcqfw4zHUh2znvMcmRzGVwCn7CJLxR TO ALLOW US TO AFFORD THE HOSTING.

THE DEVCOIN AND DEVTOME PROJECTS ARE BOTH VERY IMPORTANT TO THE COMMUNITY. PLEASE CONTRIBUTE TO ITS FURTHER SUCCESS FOR ANOTHER 5 OR MORE YEARS!

Before The Fight

An investigation into what exactly occurs in the minutes and seconds before a physical altercation, as perceived by a nightclub bouncer.

Rule #1: The Fight Starts Long Before The First Blow Is Thrown

By this I mean, in my position as a bouncer I have to learn to anticipate trouble before it starts. If I wait until the hands are flying I’ve failed in my job.

So, I have to “read” the crowd: watch their entry into the club to see if they’re acting too aggressively (or too timidly – that can be as much of a problem down the line). I scan for possible weapons; keeping your heavy winter coat on indoors is a warning sign to me. I watch for overly-loud, boisterous behavior.

For those not trained in specific techniques, the minutes before a fight are known as the “Threat Anxiety” stage: the sudden appearance of the Fight Or Flight Syndrome, triggered by the autonomic nervous system; the sympathetic nervous system releasing a “dump” of epinephrine and nor epinephrine.

If a customer at the stage is annoying employees or other customers, or shouting curses at the bar, then I usually slip next to the offending client and quietly give them “the look”. That usually suffices to cool them down for a while, but if not, I move onto the next phase…

Rule #2: Verbal De-escalation And Then Some

Known as “verbal de-escalation”, this technique is the next step in controlling the troublemaker. I have to go by their state, whether intoxicated or in a steroidal rage, in order to know what I should say to them. For some, I have to become their “buddy” for a while – this is effective with the guys who are just lonely or ticked-off at the world.

But for the guys who are on a mission to burn down the world, I have to step into the next phase of control. Known as the Survival Stress Phase, this is signified by an increase in blood pressure, faster pulse, tunnel vision, adrenaline dump and time dilation. Some negative effects of this stage include the tunnel vision of course, the blanking-out of audible clues and shaking of the limbs, all of which can be eliminated with proper training and experience.

Rule #3: Defense Only?

Legally, as the employee of a bar / nightclub I can only use justifiable force to protect myself or my customers from physical harm. In practice, there is a wide-ranging gray area to this dictum.

Let’s say a dancer is being inappropriately touched by a customer. After several repeated verbal warnings from the dancer, the customer continues his behavior. I step in, put myself between the dancer and the customer, and calmly explain our house rules. If he backs down or apologizes, no harm. If there is no response except for a sullen, angry look then I have to prepare for the worst.

If, however, the customer for whatever reason jumps up and grabs my shirt and is cursing at me, I have to take action – but at this point, it is purely defensive in my mind. My only goal is to protect the dancer and the other customers. So a joint-lock might be utilized in this case to control the patron until they calm down. Throwing punches and kicks, at least in most clubs, is frowned upon both from a legal and business standpoint – excessive-force charges are tough to beat in court and the sight of a guy beating another is hardly conducive to business.

Finally, my chief goal is to get the troublemaker OUT of the club; anything else is over-doing it. Using my head instead of my hands and feet is the best way for me to respond to an incident, it will save on emergency-room visits for both sides, and it will allow me to be the peace-loving old man that I know I truly am.

Martial Arts | Martial Arts Philosophy


QR Code
QR Code before_the_fight (generated for current page)
 

Advertise with Anonymous Ads